Mark Harmon …

Mark Harmon …

Mark Harmon (born September 2, 1951) is an American television and film actor. He has appeared in a wide variety of roles since the early 1970s.

He gained recognition for portraying Secret Service special agent Simon Donovan in The West Wing, receiving a 2002 Emmy Award nomination for his acting in the four-episode story arc. A year later he was cast in a similar role as special agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs in the American police procedural series NCIS.

He has been married to actress Pam Dawber since 1987.

The 1951 Rolling Review Show … # 122

The 1951 Rolling Review Show … # 122

Welcome to the 1951 Rolling Review Show which twice weekly features pieces of music I have enjoyed at some time in my life. I hope you enjoy them as well. Let me know if you do.

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Pam Dawber …

Pam Dawber …

Pam Dawber is an American actress. She was born on October 18, 1951. Her professional breakthrough came when she was chosen as one of the two title characters of the sitcom Mork & Mindy, which ran from 1978 to 1982. She played Mindy McConnell, the comedic foil and eventual love interest for the extraterrestrial Mork from the planet Ork, played by a then-unknown Robin Williams. He was also born in 1951 but sadly he is no longer with us.

From 1986 to 1988, she again had the title role in a TV series, playing Samantha Russell in the CBS sitcom My Sister Sam.
She is married to actor Mark Harmon who was also born in 1951.

Pam Dawber pictured with husband Mark Harmon

The 1951 Club Rolling Review Show … # 121

The 1951 Rolling Review Show … # 121

Welcome to the 1951 Rolling Review Show which twice weekly features pieces of music I have enjoyed at some time in my life. I hope you enjoy them as well. Let me know if you do.

Continue reading

My Sunday Poem … #21

My Sunday Poem … # 21

Some years ago I remember walking along the beach at Brancaster in Norfolk when I chanced upon an old fisherman’s hut. It was long abandoned and the interior open to the elements. It made me think on a time when it would have been new and probably in daily use.

It also coincided with me having recently read a wonderful poem by William Butler Yeats called The Lake Isle of Innisfree. It began:

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;
Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee,
And live alone in the bee loud glade.

I was thus later inspired to write The House of Stones …

I will build myself a house of stones
And dwell there by and by,
Close to the wild sea shore
And the seagulls’ cry.

And if,
In time to come,
My house becomes a hollow
For the wind’s lamenting song,
A temple for the moon and stars
To gaze upon,
Then chance may guide
Some weary traveller to my door.

Perhaps,
In thoughts of me,
He may brush away the passing years
And make a fire
Of all the empty wordless days.
This man of dreams
This man of clay.

The 1951 Rolling Review Show … # 120

The 1951 Rolling Review Show … # 120

Welcome to the 1951 Rolling Review Show which twice weekly features pieces of music I have enjoyed at some time in my life. I hope you enjoy them as well. Let me know if you do.

“The Haunting (Somewhere in Time)” – Kamelot

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Patti D’Arbanville

Patti D’Arbanville

Patti D’Arbanville (born May 25, 1951) is an American actress and former model.

She acted in her first film in 1960 at age 8; a New York University student film about a girl and her cat, titled Tuesday and Blue Silk. Andy Warhol discovered her during a gig as a club disc jockey when she was 13, and cast her at age 16 in his 1968 film Flesh. After Flesh, D’Arbanville performed in Warhol’s L’Amour (1973), and as the title character in David Hamilton’s movie Bilitis (1977).

 

In the late 1960s, when she was a model in London, she met and developed a romance with singer/songwriter Cat Stevens. She was very much the inspiration for at least two of his hit songs: “Lady D’Arbanville“, and “Wild World”, which were released on Mona Bone Jakon and Tea for the Tillerman, respectively.

After her unabashed risqué performances in her youth, Patti D’Arbanville has worked steadily in film and television series in the United States and France. In 1987, she won a Drama-Logue Award as Best Actress for her 1987 stage performance, in Italian American Reconciliation. She was well known for her role as Lt. Virginia Cooper on the FOX series New York Undercover.