Trooping the Colour … 1951

Trooping the Colour is a ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. It has been a tradition of British infantry regiments since the 17th century, although the roots go back much earlier. On battlefields, a regiment’s colours, or flags, were used as rallying points. Consequently, regiments would have their ensigns slowly march with their colours between the soldiers’ ranks to enable soldiers to recognise their regiments’ colours.
Since 1748 Trooping the Colour has also marked the official birthday of the British Sovereign. It is held in London annually on the second Saturday in June.
From the reign of King Edward VII, the Sovereign has taken the salute in person.
However, in 1951 King George VI was to ill to attend the ceremony (he later had a lung removed in September 1951 due to lung cancer), so HRH The Princess Elizabeth (the heiress presumptive) took the King’s place at the ceremony.
FOLLOW THIS LINK TO VIEW BBC TELEVISON COVERAGE OF TROOPING THE COLOUR FROM 1951

FOLLOW THIS LINK FOR SOME COLOUR FOOTAGE  OF THIS.

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