Flight to Mars (1951)

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Flight to Mars (1951)

Flight to Mars is a 1951 American science fiction film produced by Walter Mirisch for Monogram Pictures. It stars Marguerite Chapman, Cameron Mitchelland Arthur Franz.

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The story involves the arrival on the Red Planet of an American scientific expedition team, who discover that Mars is inhabited by an underground-dwelling but dying civilization that appear to be human.

The Martians

The Martians

The Martians are suspicious of the Earthmen’s motives. A majority of their governing body finally decides to keep their visitors prisoner, never allowing them to return home with the information they have discovered. But the Earthmen have sympathizers among the Martians.

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Soon a plan is set in motion to smuggle the scientists and their Martian allies aboard the now guarded spaceship and make an escape for Earth.

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The film was a low-budget “quickie” shot in just five days.
On location principal photography took place in Death Valley, California from May 11 through late May 1951.

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19 responses to “Flight to Mars (1951)

  1. If One had put £1 000 down for a seat on the first flight to Mars in 1951, how much would it be worth today or in 2025?

    • Well … in the region of £25,000 but that wouldn’t even get you into Earth orbit now. I suspect you may well have already considered an answer to your question. Come on. Out with it.

      • If it had been a bet, and the prospect seems more likely now than ever…..lots and lots – enough to pay for multiple seats on a commercial Mars voyage, methinks!

  2. I remember a movie Forbidden Planet which “starred” Robbie the robot!!!! Thx for the memory jog! 🙂

  3. It is so interesting to see these old trailers and how it impressed everybody because nothing else was known. That is actually the intriguing perspective for watching it today!

  4. Typical movie for that era. Love them 🙂

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